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Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand



Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane’s bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War.

The lieutenant’s name was Louis Zamperini. In boyhood, he’d been a cunning and incorrigible delinquent, breaking into houses, brawling, and fleeing his home to ride the rails. As a teenager, he had channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics and within sight of the four-minute mile. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman, embarking on a journey that led to his doomed flight, a tiny raft, and a drift into the unknown.

Read more . . .

Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a foundering raft, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will.

Random House; 1st edition (November 16, 2010)

Louis Zamperini WWII Bombadier

 


Book Club Party Ideas for Unbroken

Host a 1940s USO themed book club party for Unbroken with plenty of patriotic decorations. USO clubs were set up during World War II all over the United States in churches, museums, barns, storefronts, railroad cars — wherever space was available — to provide a little respite from the war for soldiers. Social activities such as potlucks and dances were held. And, very important to the USO social gatherings were the young hostesses. Hostesses were encouraged to dress their best and look pretty, and to entertain the young men. Only good girls need apply!

Dress for you party as Rosie the Riveter by wearing your hair in a bandana, shirt with sleeves rolled-up, and jeans or overalls; a USO hostess in pretty ’40s clothes to cheer the troops; or throw on some khakis.

The music of the forties is fantastic with sounds from The Andrews Sisters, and swing and big band. Music like this was played in the USO clubs across the U.S. to help cheer the servicemen and get their minds off the war, if only for a few hours.


Book Club Menu for Unbroken

Plan a USO-style potluck for your book club guests. Whole communities came together to make the USO potlucks extra special for the troops. Even though sugar and beef were hard to come by, there was no scrimping at these potlucks for the young servicemen.

Baked Ham, Green Peas with Bacon, and Corn Pudding

Ham with Green Peas and Corn Pudding

A plate of NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Chocolate Chip Cookies and a rich Devils Food Cake served for dessert.

Toll House Cookies

Ice down plenty of Pepsi. In the 1940s, Pepsi-Cola (as it was known back then) adopted a red, white, and blue logo to support America’s war effort.

Pepsi 1940's Pepsi-Cola Bottle

 


Book Club Resources for Unbroken

Ratings at the time this post was published

Goodreads: 4.43 stars (411,787 ratings)
Amazon: 4.8 stars (26,657 ratings)
LibraryThing: 4.4 stars (2,209 ratings)
My Rating: 4.75 stars A gripping account of Louie Zamperini’s WWII experiences. I couldn’t put this novel down!  Louie was a true American hero – flaws and all.

Discussion Questions

Spoiler Alert: Discussion guide may contain spoilers to the book.

1. Louie’s experiences are singular: None of us is going to be in a plane crash, strafed by a bomber, attacked by sharks, cast away on a raft, or held as a POW. And yet the word most often used to describe him is “inspiring.” What does Louie’s experience demonstrate that makes him so inspirational to people who will never endure what he did? What are the lessons that his life offers to all of us?

2. Is Louie a hero? How do you define heroism?

3. In Louie’s boyhood, he was severely bullied, then became a delinquent and hellraiser. In these experiences, did he already display attributes that would help him survive his wartime ordeal? Did he also show weaknesses or tendencies that foreshadowed the struggles he would face postwar?

4. Did Louie’s athletic career help prepare him for what he would face in war?

5. Louie was especially close to his brother Pete, who devoted himself to him. If Pete hadn’t been there, what would have become of Louie? Does Pete deserve credit for shaping Louie into a man who could endure and survive his Odyssean ordeal?

6. Hillenbrand explores the extraordinary risks faced by America’s WWII airmen: 54,000 men killed in combat, 36,000 killed in noncombat aircraft accidents, and a stunning 15,000 men killed in stateside training—at times, an average of 19 per day. Men faced a 50% chance of being killed during combat tours of only 30-40 missions. Were you aware of the dangers faced by airmen in the Pacific war? What facts and stories were most surprising to you?
Read more . . .


7. What are your feelings about Mac? Do you feel sympathy for him? Anger? If you endured the trauma of a plane crash, and were placed in a situation that you knew very few men survived, might you have reacted as he did? In the end, did he redeem himself?

8. When Louie, Phil and Mac were on the raft, a key factor in their survival was optimism. All three men were young and able-bodied, veterans of the same training, experiencing the same hardships and traumas, yet Louie and Phil remained optimistic while Mac was hopeless, seemingly doomed by his pessimism. Why are some people hopeful, and others not? How important is attitude and mindset in determining one’s ability to overcome hardship?

9. What did you find most remarkable about the things Louie and Phil did to survive on the raft?

10. Over 47 days on the raft, the men lost half their body weight, and were rendered mere skeletons. Yet they refused to consider cannibalism, which had not been uncommon among castaways before them. Would you, in the same situation, ever consider cannibalism? If it could ensure that two men survived, when otherwise all three would almost certainly perish, would it be a moral decision?

11. Louie believed he was the beneficiary of several miracles, among them his escape from the wreckage of his plane, the fact that he and the other men were not hit with bullets when their rafts were strafed, and the appearance of the singers in the clouds. What is your interpretation of those experiences?

12. The POWs took enormous risks to carry out thefts, sabotage, and other acts of defiance. Men would risk their lives to steal items as trivial as pencil boxes. What benefit did they derive from defiance that was worth risking death, or severe beatings?

13. In the 1930s and 1940s, Germany and Japan carried out what are arguably the worst acts of mass atrocity in history. What leads individuals, and even whole societies, to descend to such a level? What motivated the notoriously sadistic POW camp guards in Japan, particularly the Bird? Do we all carry the capacity for cruelty?

14. After the war, Louie would say that of all the horrors he witnessed and experienced in the war, the death of the little duck, Gaga, was the worst. Why was this event especially wrenching for him and the other POWs?

15. Louie, Frank Tinker, and William Harris planned to escape from Ofuna, walk across Japan, steal a boat and make a run for China. It was an attempt that very likely would have ended in their deaths. Was it foolish, or did it offer a psychological benefit that was worth the enormous risk?

16. Louie joined a plot to kill the Bird. Was he justified in doing so? Would it have been a moral act? Do you think Louie could have found peace after the war, had he killed the Bird?

17. Unbroken reveals that, under the “kill-all order,” the Japanese planned to murder all POWs, a plan that was never carried out because of the dropping of the atomic bombs. The book also explores the lengths to which the Japanese were prepared to go to avoid surrender. How did the book make you feel about America’s use of the atomic bomb on Japan?

18. “Anger is a justifiable and understandable reaction to being wronged, and as the soul’s first effort to reassert its worth and power, it may initially be healing,” Laura Hillenbrand wrote in an article for Guideposts magazine. “But in time, anger becomes corrosive. To live in bitterness is to be chained to the person who wounded you, your emotions and actions arising not independently, but in reaction to your abuser. Louie became so obsessed with vengeance that his life was consumed by the quest for it. In bitterness, he was as much a captive as he’d been when barbed wire had surrounded him.” Do you agree?

19. Many of us struggle to forgive those who have wronged us, but forgiveness is often so difficult to find. What makes it so hard to let resentment go?

20. “What the Bird took from Louie was his dignity; what he left behind was a pervasive sense of helplessness and worthlessness,” Hillenbrand continued in her Guideposts article. “As I researched Louie’s life, interviewing his fellow POWs and studying their memoirs and diaries, I discovered that this loss of dignity was nearly ubiquitous, leaving the men feeling defenseless and frightened in a world that had become menacing. The postwar nightmares, flashbacks, alcoholism and anxiety that were endemic among them spoke of souls in desperate fear. Watching these men struggle to overcome their trauma, I came to believe that a loss of self-worth is central to the experience of being victimized, and may be what makes its pain particularly devastating.” Do you agree?

21. Hillenbrand wrote that among the former POWs she interviewed, forgiveness became possible once the POW had found a way to restore his sense of dignity. Was this what Billy Graham gave to Louie? If so, what was it about that experience, and that sermon, gave Louie back his self-worth?

22. Do Louie Zamperini’s wartime and postwar experiences give you a different perspective on a loved one who was, or is, a veteran?

23. Why has most WWII literature focused on the European war, with so little attention paid to the Pacific war?

(Discussion Questions from laurahillenbrandbooks.com)

Purchase Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand at your favorite bookseller

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The Author

American author Laura Hillenbrand was born in 1967 and currently resides in Washington DC with her husband, Borden Flanagan. Hillenbrand has published magazine articles in American Heritage, The New Yorker, and Equus, and the novels Unbroken (2010), and Seabiscuit: An American Legend (2001). Indie Next List December 2010

Recommended Reading

 


Our book club likes to plan book-related outings whenever we get the chance. In our very own backyard we have the National Museum of the Pacific War, originally named The Admiral Nimitz Museum, in Fredericksburg, Texas. Check for museums in your area and plan a history outing to learn a bit more about the war in the Pacific.

The National World War II Museum




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