Host An Unforgettable Book Club

Book Selection, Ideas, Food for Thought,
and More!

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The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Aibileen is a black maid in 1962 Jackson, Mississippi, who’s always taken orders quietly, but lately she’s unable to hold her bitterness back. Her friend Minny has never held her tongue but now must somehow keep secrets about her employer that leave her speechless. White socialite Skeeter just graduated college. She’s full of ambition, but without a husband, she’s considered a failure. Together, these seemingly different women join together to write a tell-all book about work as a black maid in the South, that could forever alter their destinies and the life of a small town

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

The Night Circus is the tale of two young magicians, Marco and Celia, who are bound to a game in which neither has chosen to participate and in which neither fully understands the rules.

The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein

The Art of Racing in the Rain is about a philosophical, television-watching dog named Enzo, who dreams of the day he becomes a man. He gives us his wise (and comedic) observations of the world as he helps his owner, a race car driver who faces a series of heart-wrenching experiences, along the right path. Whether you have a dog or not, this book will make you laugh and touch your heart.

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson

The third book in the Millennium series begins with Lisbeth Salander in the hospital recovering from a gunshot wound to the head as she prepares for her upcoming trial with the help of her computer-savvy friends and the oversexed journalist Blomkvist. In The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, Lisbeth again nails it to those who have done her wrong, particularly the men who hate women.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

Pour yourself some Glogg as you read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, a story about a misfit girl with a photographic memory and a promiscuous journalist who eventually team up to solve the mystery of a murder that occurred almost 40 years ago. In this first installment of the Millenium series, you get an introduction to Lisbeth Salander, one of the most intriguing characters I have ever read about.

Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson

Wry, courtly, opinionated, and completely endearing, the Major leads a quiet life valuing the proper things that Englishmen have lived by for generations: honor, duty, decorum, and a properly brewed cup of tea. But then his brother’s death sparks an unexpected friendship with Mrs. Jasmina Ali, the Pakistani shopkeeper from the village.

The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee

he Emperor of All Maladies is a magnificent, profoundly humane “biography” of cancer—from its first documented appearances thousands of years ago through the epic battles in the twentieth century to cure, control, and conquer it to a radical new understanding of its essence. Physician, researcher, and award-winning science writer, Siddhartha Mukherjee examines cancer with a cellular biologist’s precision, a historian’s perspective, and a biographer’s passion.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine.

Room book cover

Room by Emma Donoghue

The narrator of Room is 5 year old Jack who lives with his Ma in an 11×11 shed where Ma has been held captive by the man who abducted her 7 years ago.

Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout

This book by Elizabeth Strout is a series of short stories primarily set in Maine with a common character, Olive Kitteridge, a retired schoolteacher. As the townspeople grapple with their problems, mild and dire, Olive is brought to a deeper understanding of herself and her life–sometimes painfully, but always with ruthless honesty. Olive Kitteridge offers profound insights into the human condition–its conflicts, its tragedies and joys, and the endurance it requires.

Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

Elizabeth Gilbert was in her 30s when she realized the life she had made for herself was not the life she wanted. Dealing with divorce, depression and an unhealthy love affair, she plans a year long voyage to find those things that were missing in her life. She heads to Rome to experience the pleasures in life, India to learn about meditation and devotion and Bali to experience balance.

The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown

The Andreas family is one of readers. Their father, a renowned Shakespeare professor who speaks almost entirely in verse, has named his three daughters after famous Shakespearean women. When the sisters return to their childhood home, ostensibly to care for their ailing mother, but really to lick their wounds and bury their secrets, they are horrified to find the others there.

Honolulu by Alan Brennert

“In Korea in those days, newborn girls were not deemed important enough to be graced with formal names, but were instead given nicknames, which often reflected the parents’ feelings on the birth of a daughter: I knew a girl named Anger, and another called Pity. As for me, my parents named me Regret.”

A Room with a View by E.M. Forster

A Room With a View is a surprisingly entertaining novel set in Italy and England in the early 20th century. This social comedy is about a high society girl trying to choose between the life that is expected of her and following her heart.

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom

When her parents die on the ship from Ireland, young Lavinia is taken in as an indentured servant at the plantation of the captain. The slaves become her family. When she is taken to the city, she wants nothing more than to return to the plantation and her family. However, when she does, everything has changed.



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